Whose side are you on?

Writing this blog – intended to be on current cancer-related topics – has been very good for me, if no one else, because it makes me read things I wouldn’t otherwise bother with. So I’m wiser than I would have been – but here’s a shocking admission: I’m becoming increasingly sympathetic to those who wish that scientists would just go away – or at least shut up sometimes. Of course I’m being jolly unfair: it’s not so much fellow boffins I’m miffed with as the ‘media’ – the BBC and the leading newspapers. They’re the ones who bring ‘stuff’ to my attention. Do you think I spend my time reading a journal called Alcohol and Alcoholism?!

Thanks to the medja, in just the last couple of weeks I’ve read that women’s height is linked to ovarian cancer  (BBC), breast cancer screening results in ‘unnecessary treatment’ (Telegraph), and a glass of wine carries a breast cancer warning (The Independent), – oh, and I should take an take an aspirin a day to cut cancer risk (Guardian). Just a month or two ago there was a similar stampede of ‘beef is bad’. This week the University of Gothenburg weighed in by discovering that some people are so ‘addicted’ to Facebook that they open it the moment they switch on their computers! And getting hooked (to Facebook, that is) makes women unhappy. Thank heavens they didn’t get round to emails or prostate cancer in Gothenburg or I might be needing something stronger than aspirin for my depression.

If you’d looked at all these important scientific surveys you’d have spotted that they have one thing in common: they never mention fun. Not one of them. Ever. Not a smile, nary a joyous feeling – and as for anything orgasmic …

Salvation is at hand

The good news is that some relieving guidance has popped up in the midst of all this ‘thou shalt not’, ‘it’s too late’ and ‘now look what you’ve done’. The absolutely astonishing thing is its source – ‘provenance’ as the antiques freaks like to put it. You aren’t going to believe this but it’s to the good old Church of England that we turn in the shape of a vicar from Hove (go on then …). This blessed man has revealed that not only is it a ‘good thing’ but it’s almost a moral duty, perhaps even a religious obligation, to spend Easter Sunday in bed, eating chocolate and having sex – and, by implication, doing anything else that feels as though it should be in the ‘naughty but nice’ statistical bracket. Well – who would have thought you’d read it here – praise be for the C of E!            Photograph by Hemera/Thinkstock

Here comes another of them scientists

Having let the grumpies have their say, shall we do as we preach and have a balanced, non-inflammatory comment on behalf of beleaguered boffins? Oh alright. Should the studies I listed have been done? Yes (apart from the Scandi one, obviously). They’re by excellent groups and they add another brick to the wall, even if it’s only reaffirming what we knew. The ovarian/height link paper makes a good case by pointing out that the evidence so far published on whether height, weight and body mass index (BMI) have any link with the risk of getting ovarian cancer has not given a very clear picture. They were thus prompted to put together 47 of these studies (a meta analysis) – and what emerged was that the risk increases with height and, for women who have never used hormone therapy, with BMI. However, the important point is that although the increases are statistically significant, they are very small. My colleague Paul Pharoah has helpfully estimated that they show that being 5ft 6in rather than 5ft tall raises the lifetime risk of ovarian cancer from about 16 in 1000 to 20 in 1000.

So these reports are good, though not seismic, stuff. And yes, it’s great that the media pick up on what science produces and bring it to the attention of the wider world. It would just be nice if they were less keen on eye-catching, doomy, headlines. How about taking a lead from The Sun, an organ not previously mentioned in this column, that headlined the C of E story with Easter Sinday. What might they do? Aspirin v. Expirin? I came up with a cracker for the ovarian study but a problem with talking and writing about cancer is the ease with which jokes (mine anyway!) teeter into what some would consider to be the realms of bad taste. So a green light for The Sun then!

Final thought for the day: am I now (1) religiously taking aspirin OR (2) opting for Nick the Vic’s life support strategy? I think you know the answer to that one.

References

Collaborative Group on Epidemiological Studies of Ovarian Cancer (2012) Ovarian Cancer and Body Size: Individual Participant Meta-Analysis Including 25,157 Women with Ovarian Cancer from 47 Epidemiological Studies. PLoS Med 9(4): e1001200. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001200

Kalager, M., Adami, H.O., Bretthauer, M. and Tamimi, R.M. (2012). Overdiagnosis of Invasive Breast Cancer Due to 491 Mammography Screening: Results From the Norwegian Screening Program. Annals of Internal Medicine 156, 491-499.

Rothwell, P.M., Wilson, M., Price. J.F., Belch, J.F.F., Meade, T.W. and Mehta, Z. (2012). Effect of daily aspirin on risk of cancer metastasis: a study of incident cancers during randomised controlled trials. The Lancet, Early Online Publication, 21 March 2012 doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(12)60209-8Cite or Link Using DOI

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One comment on “Whose side are you on?

  1. Ha Robin I can guess which one you favour! Headlines love misery, the mail should be sold with Prozac IMO! Anyway glad to hear I can ignore most of the scarey news and follow my heart or body…. The past month I got a little over addicted to FB and online forums and I have never felt so depressed and have almost thrown the damn iPad out. But am now going to use it to download funny movies. Thanks for being the voice of reason! X

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