Twenty winks

Not now obviously but after you’ve read the first episode of this absorbing tale you may feel a nap is in order, despite the fact that in Wake up at the back we noted that snoring can give you cancer.

Setting aside that hazard, the general finding is that most people require seven or eight hours of sleep to function optimally. Fall short of that, to less than six hours even for one night, and we all know that the consequences may include a degree of grumpiness helped along by a tendency to clumsiness and generally heightened incompetence. If you happen to suffer from hypertension you could measure another result because your blood pressure will be even higher than usual for the rest of the day. However, these are all reversible states, so that real problems only come with more extended sleep deprivation and there is much evidence that this can profoundly affect memory, creativity and emotional stability, as well as leading to heart disease, diabetes and obesity. The molecular drive for the latter is that folk who are short of sleep have lower levels of the hormone leptin (which tells the brain you’ve had enough to eat) but higher levels of ghrelin (appetite stimulant). One week of only four hours nightly kip converts healthy young men to pre-diabetics in terms of their insulin and blood sugar levels.

The cancer link

To all of which must be added the dribble of reports over many years that disrupted sleep patterns, such as result from shift-work, may increase the risk of a variety of cancers (these include breast, prostate, bowel and endometrial cancers and also non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma). The effects are moderate (that is, the risk rise is small – typically up to 20%), making these findings suggestive rather than conclusive, although they are bolstered by a considerable number of studies on animals. So sleep, or rather lack of it, is yet another of these things that seems to affect cancer but for which really hard evidence is lacking. It’s not a9f5f190difficult to see why. You can’t put a number on ‘a good night’s sleep’ (though you can now get phone apps that record your every snort and contortion) nor do we understand the biological consequences of sleep disruption, and then there are the perpetual problems that everyone’s different and cancers take years to show themselves. However, you can put a figure on how you feel about sleep: our friends at the wonderful Karolinska Institute in Stockholm have come up with a Sleepiness Scale (1 = very alert, 9 = very sleepy, great effort to keep awake) – which could replace the traditional grunt when asked ‘How are you?’ ‘Oh, much as usual, about eight on the Karolinska Scale.’

Sleeping Off Breast Cancer

Trawling the literature it seems that the majority of cancer/sleep studies focus on the breast and a word about two of the most recent will suffice to paint the picture. In a large group of Japanese ladies over the age of 40 those who said they slept for less than six hours were markedly more likely to develop breast cancer than those who slept longer. Over nine hours a night (sleep that is) even appeared to give a degree of protection.

The main culprit for the breast cancer/sleep link is shift work, illustrated by the Danish military where women working night-shifts are more prone to breast cancer than those with normal sleep patterns and there is an upward trend in risk with years of night-shift work.

An association with ovarian cancer has also been reported although, somewhat perplexingly, that study didn’t show that the risk got bigger the longer night-shifts were worked. This rather confusing picture may reflect individual variation. As we all know, some folk are ‘larks’ – up at the crack of dawn – my lady wife is one – whereas others are ‘owls’ who perform better the later it is (no prize for guessing what kind of bird I am – bit of domestic incompatibility there!). It may be that ‘owls’ suffer less from night-shift perturbation and they may therefore be more likely to opt for that mode of work – and indeed the Danish study found that ‘larks’ on night-shifts were more likely to get breast cancer. As if that’s not enough, irregular shift patterns make it more difficult for women to conceive and working only nights increases the chances of miscarrying.

Similar results have been found for other cancers, notably of the bowel – 50% more likely to occur in those who sleep an average of less than six hours a night than those who zzzz for over seven. Put another way, the less than six hours risk is about the same as having a first degree relative with the disease or eating lots of red meat – and similar to that for breast cancer.

Mu Treadmill

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Mice Sleep Too

It’s not a bad idea to keep in mind that we are very similar to mice – we’ve got more or less the same number of genes and exercising (on a treadmill for example) helps to keep at least some cancers at bay. Another similarity is that sleep deprivation upsets the works so that, for example, in models of colon cancer it reverses the beneficial effects of moderate exercise.

So insomnia is no laughing matter, however it comes about, and next time we’ll put two and two together by looking at the molecular story – after which you really may need forty winks.

 References

Kakizaki, M. et al. (2008).  Sleep duration and the risk of breast cancer: the Ohsaki Cohort Study. Br J Cancer  99, 1502–1505.

Hansen, J. and Lassen, C.F. (2012). Nested case-control study of night shift work and breast cancer risk among women in the Danish military. Occup Environ Med., 69, 551–556.

Bhatti, P. et al. (2012). Nightshift work and risk of ovarian cancer. Occup Environ Med., 0:1–7. doi:10.1136/oemed-2012-101146.

Thompson, C.L. et al. (2011). Short Duration of Sleep Increases Risk of Colorectal Adenoma. Cancer 117, 841–847.

Zielinski, M.R. et al. (2012). Influence of chronic moderate sleep restriction and exercise on inflammation and carcinogenesis in mice. Brain, Behavior, and Immunity 26, 672–679.

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