Cancer Genetics: Never Black or White

The National Heath Service occupies a uniquely revered place in the psyche of the British people – as indeed it should, the concept of free, first rate health care available when required being one of the hallmarks of civilization. Founded in 1948, the NHS has continued to this day to fulfill its remit with astonishing efficiency in the face of demands beyond comprehension sixty years ago, as both the size of the population and life expectancy have increased and medical practice has been transformed by technical advances. Even so, there is one area in which there is a surprising shortfall in the performance of the NHS when compared with most other European countries or with the USA – cancer survival rates.

We’re behind you!!

Broadly speaking, the latest findings of a massive study (called CONCORD-2, a long-term global comparison of cancer survival) show 5-year cancer survival rates in the UK for 2005 to 2009 to have been worse than they were in many European countries at least a decade earlier. “Shameful” cried Macmillan Cancer Support – rarely a helpful response but you have to concede it’s scarcely grounds for an outbreak of British smugness. More to the point, Cancer Research UK insisted the gulf was often linked to deprivation, i.e. patients in poorer areas tend to live unhealthy lifestyles so they are more susceptible and likely to be diagnosed later. This refers to what has become known as the postcode (zipcode) lottery whereby the chances of being diagnosed early and surviving various forms of cancer differ significantly (meaning as much as two-fold!) across the UK. Further contributions come from general practitioners missing the early signs of cancer, adding to the delay in referral, together with variable standards of treatment.

And the answer is?

But hang on! None of this actually explains why these problems should be more acute in the UK than in, say, France or Finland who presumably have their share of the poor and incompetent. So what might be different in the UK? Here’s my theory. Maybe it’s just us, the Jane & John Does lining up to become cancer patients. Dentists reckon they can pick Brits from Yanks just by peering into their oral cavities (Brits have cavities {ho ho} whereas Americans are perfect – tooth-wise that is). Why? Because we don’t care: we figure our bodies are non-maintenance machines – so we never dream of getting them serviced, that is, having regular check-ups – and when they do conk out we expect the wondrous NHS to fix it. To see if there’s any truth in this theory I conducted a meaningless, random poll in my department (featuring two Americans, one Finn, a Dutchman, two German ladies and a French girl – all from nations that do better than the UK) asking ‘how health aware are your countrymen compared with the British?’ Result? They’re all hypochondriacs compared to Brits whose default method is to avoid doctors until they’re at death’s door. So there we have it: it’s our fault and if we just looked after ourselves a bit better the UK would scrabble its way up the cancer survival league.

Sounds familiar?

Take the specific example of breast cancer. 81% of UK women diagnosed between 2005 and 2009 were alive five years later but in Sweden, France and Italy the rates range from 86 to 87%. This kind of gap is reminiscent of that in the USA between African American women and those of European descent – presently 79% versus 92 % – a disparity that has remained pretty constant over the last 40 years even though the survival rates of both groups have steadily risen (the overall USA survival rate for breast cancer is now 89%). Again the divide has been attributed to poverty and education level, together with lack of health insurance, so that detection is delayed and survival times shortened.

So it’s clear that multiple factors contribute to the variable treatment success rates but so far there’s no evidence that genetic differences play a part, for example, by giving rise to more aggressive forms of cancer.

A little more light in one corner

Breast cancers are an enormously varied set of diseases and as such they’re a challenge even to classify yet alone to treat. The recent rapid progress in DNA sequencing has led to a new genome-based classification system but there is still strong reliance on the traditional prognostic and predictive factors, notably what’s called hormonal status – meaning presence on the surface of the tumour cells of the protein receptors to which the hormones oestrogen and progesterone attach, together with the presence or otherwise of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). One significant sub-group has no detectable levels of these proteins – they’re ‘triple negative’ – and they make up 10-15% of breast cancers (TNBCs). TNBCs are very aggressive cancers (poor prognosis), known for some years to disproportionally affect young women of African origin – it’s about twice as common in African Americans as in European Americans.

Untitled

The triple negative breast cancer survival rate dependence on race.

African-American women with TNBC have poorer survival rates than women of European descent (Dietze et al., 2015).

Step forward DNA sequencing – again!

What wasn’t known was anything by way of explanation of these epidemiological findings but from sequencing tumour DNA it has emerged that mutations in BRCA1 are present in most (69%) of TNBCs in women of European origin. Inherited mutations in BRCA1 are particularly associated with breast and ovarian cancers, as we explained in a recent item on Angelina Jolie (A Taxing Inheritance). But here’s a very odd thing: African-American women have a low incidence of BRCA1 mutations (less than 20%), despite the fact that they are relatively prone to TNBC.

What’s new?

Well, if BRCA1 isn’t doing the driving there must be other potent drivers for TNBC and the new genetic studies have given us one more piece in the molecular jigsaw of cancer. However, to take up Frances M. Visco’s point in a recent letter to The New York Times and one that I have made forcefully elsewhere (in Not another ‘Great Cancer Breakthrough’!!! and Gentlemen! For goodness’ sake …), this is not another ‘breakthrough’ yet alone a ‘great one.’ It won’t save lives until we identify what the other drivers are and come up with a therapeutic ploy to exploit our knowledge.

Right on cue, step forward Alex Swarbrick, Simon Junankar and colleagues from Sydney’s Garvan Institute of Medical Research who have just found that a protein called ID4 appears to control some TNBCs: it’s present at high levels in about half of all TNBCs. ID4 stands for ‘inhibitor of differentiation 4′ which means that it keeps cells in a state where they can continue to divide – a hallmark of cancer.

So now it’s over to the lads from down under to do the difficult bit and come up with an inhibitor of ID4 – and to show that it works to stop TNBCs in their tracks.

References

Allemani, C. et al., (2015). Global surveillance of cancer survival 1995-2009: analysis of individual data for 25 676 887 patients from 279 population-based registries in 67 countries (CONCORD-2). Lancet 385, 977-1010.

Dietze, E. et al., (2015). Triple-negative breast cancer in African-American women: disparities versus biology. Nature Reviews Cancer 15, 248–254.

Junankar, S. et al., (2015). ID4 controls mammary stem cells and marks breast cancers with a stem cell-like phenotype. Nature Communications 6, Article number: 6548 doi:10.1038/ncomms7548.

 

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