And Now There Are Six!!

Scientists eh! What a drag they can be! Forever coming up with new things that the rest of us have to wrap our minds around (or at least feel we should try).

Readers of these pages will know I’m periodically apt to wax rhapsodic about ‘the secret of life’ – the fact that all living things arise from just four different chemical units, A, C, G and T. Well, from now on it seems I’ll need to watch my words – or at least my letters – though maybe for a while I can leave it on the back burner in the “things that have been but not yet” category, to use the melodic prose of Christopher Fry.

Who dunnit?

The problem is down to Floyd Romesberg and his team at the Scripps Research Institute in California.

Building on a lot of earlier work, they’ve made synthetic units that stick together to form pairs – just like A-T and C-G do in double-stranded DNA. But, as these novel chemicals (X & Y) are made in the lab, the bond they form is an unnatural base pair.

Left: Two intertwined strands of DNA are held together in part by hydrogen bonds. Right top: Two such bonds (dotted lines) link adenine (A) to thymine (T); three form between guanine (G) and cytosine (C). These bases attach to sugar units (ribose) and phosphate groups (P) to form DNA chains. Right bottom: Synthetic X and Y units can also stick together and, via ribose and phosphate, become part of DNA.

After much fiddling Romesberg’s group derived E. coli microbes that would take up X and Y when they were fed to the cells as part of their normal growth medium. The cells treat X and Y like the units they make themselves (A, C, G & T) and insert them in new DNA – so a stretch of genetic code may then read: A-C-G-T-X-T-A-C-Y-A-T-… And, once part of DNA, the novel units are passed on to the next generation.

Science fiction?
If this has you thinking creation and exploitation of entirely new life forms?!!’ you’re not alone. Seemingly Romesberg is frequently asked if he’s setting up Jurassic Park but, as he points out, the modified bugs he’s created survive only as long as they’re fed X and Y so if they ‘escape’ (being bugs this would probably be down the drain rather than over a fence), they die. Cunning eh?!!

Is this coming to a gene near you?
No. It is, however, clear that more synthetic bases will be made, expanding the power of the genetic code yet further. What isn’t yet known is what the cells will make of all this. In other words, the whole point of tinkering with DNA is to modify the code to make novel proteins. In the first instance the hope is that these might be useful in disease treatment. Rather longer-term is the notion that new organisms might emerge with specific functions – e.g., bugs that break down plastic waste materials.

At the moment all this is speculation. But what is now fact is amazing enough. After 4,000 million years since the first life-forms emerged, more than five billion different species have appeared (and mostly disappeared) on earth – all based on a genetic code of just four letters.

Now, in a small lab in southern California, Mother Nature has been given an upgrade. It’s going to be fascinating to see what she does with it!

Reference

Zhang, Y. et al. (2017). Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 114, 1317-1322.

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