Born On Wings

 

Alexander Porfiryevich Borodin is a name that will perhaps be familiar only to musical folk of a fairly dedicated kind. Which is a shame because he wrote some wonderful music particularly in his symphonies, in the magical portrait of the steppes of Central Asia and in his opera Prince Igor, albeit not finishing the latter. But Borodin was more than just a gifted composer for he started life as an illegitimate child, qualified as a doctor in Saint Petersburg and became a Professor of Chemistry at the Imperial Medical-Surgical Academy in that city. He carried out some very significant chemical research – he’s even got a reaction named after him – whilst, as a hobby, becoming a sufficiently outstanding composer to be one of The Mighty Handful. Along the way he founded the School of Medicine for Women in Saint Petersburg, the first Russian medical institute for women.

Advanced chemistry

With that background we can be sure that Borodin would have been thrilled to note the recent headlines about the trial of a breathalyser test for cancers. It’s being run by my colleague Rebecca Fitzgerald of the Cancer Research UK Cambridge Centre (and of tea bag fame: see Open Wide for Pasty’s Throat), initially for people suspected to have oesophageal or stomach cancers but in time to be extended to other cancers. What would have excited the chemist in Borodin is that the test collects airborne molecules from the breath and uses the most advanced modern chemistry to analyse them (the details don’t matter but, for the record, the critical method is called Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectroscopy (FAIMS) which distinguishes molecules by how fast they move when driven through a gas by an electric field).

What’s new?

At first pass it may sound fanciful to think of detecting cancer on the breath but perhaps it shouldn’t. After all, we’re familiar with breathalysers that detect alcohol levels and, more generally, we all know that ‘bad breath’ isn’t a good sign. For example, the smell of acetone on the breath can arise from type I diabetes, when the body increases its use of fat due to low insulin levels. My old chemistry teacher was known throughout the school as ‘Fruity’ — the word he used with relish to describe the scent of ketones (acetone is the smallest member of the ketones).

The general point is that molecules released from cells can find their way into the lungs and emerge in the breath and now they can be identifed to find signatures indicative of disease.

The detection of breath-born chemicals can inform diagnosis and treatment of disease. From ebook “Breath Biopsy: The Complete Guide” by Owlstone Medical Ltd.

Pioneering this approach is a company called Owlstone Medical whose Breath Biopsy analytical platform carries out the spectroscopy of airborne molecules (volatile organic compounds). The idea is that someone exhales into a mask and chemicals born on the breath are collected by a cartridge for subsequent analysis. More than 1000 different compounds can be identified by this state-of-the-art technology and for cancer detection these may include substances released by tumour cells and also those emanating from host cells that have been drawn into the tumour microenvironment.

Followers of this blog will know of my enthusiasm for cancer early detection, in particular the liquid biopsy method that permits the isolation of tumour DNA from small blood samples. The breathalyzer system is a different approach to the same problem — and it may be that, in the end, both will have useful roles to play. I should add that my publicizing Owlstone Medical is entirely on account of the apparent potential of their system for cancer screening. Although the company is based in Cambridge, I have no connection with them. I rather wish I had.

If Borodin was here to comment he might wryly observe that in his opera the breaths launched by the enslaved captives when they start to sing ‘Born on wings …’ carried only grief and sorrow but with Breath Biopsy it may be that bad news enwraps good — if it carries a warning of cancers or other diseases sufficiently early that they may be stopped in their tracks.

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One comment on “Born On Wings

  1. Pingback: Sticky Cancer Genes | Betrayed by Nature: The War on Cancer

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