Blocking the Unblockable

 

It’s very nearly 40 years since the first human ‘cancer gene’ was identified — in 1982 to be precise. By ‘cancer gene’ we mean a region of DNA that encodes a protein that has a role in normal cell behaviour but that has acquired a mutation of some sort that confers abnormal activity on the protein.

The discovery of RAS ‘oncogene’ activation by DNA and protein mutation stimulated intense activity in unveiling the origins of cancer at the molecular level that has continued to this day. It’s been an exciting and sobering story and RAS has emerged as perhaps the best example you could have of the paradox of cancer. On the one hand it seems startlingly simple: on the other it’s been impenetrably complex.

The simple bit first

Relatively quickly it was shown that there were three closely related RAS genes (KRAS, HRAS & NRAS): they all encode a small protein of just 189 amino acids and they all act as a molecular switches. That means RAS proteins can bind to a small regulator molecule (it’s GTP (guanosine triphosphate) — one of the nucleotides found in DNA and RNA). When that happens RAS changes shape so that it can interact with (i.e. stick to) a variety of effector proteins within the cell. These trigger signalling cascades that ultimately control the activity of genes in the nucleus that control cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis (cell death). The switch is flicked off when GTP is converted to GDP — so RAS looses its effector binding capacity.

The other simple bit is that RAS turned out to be one end of the spectrum of DNA damage that can activate an oncogene: the smallest possible change in DNA — mutation of just one base changed one amino acid in the RAS protein and hence its shape. Result: permanently switched on RAS: it’s always stuck to GTP.

Cell signalling. Cells receive many signals from messengers that attach to receptor proteins spanning the outer membrane. Activated receptors turn on relays of proteins. RAS proteins are key nodes that transmit multiple signals. The coloured blocks represent a RAS controlled pathway (a relay of proteins, A, B, C, D) that ‘talk’ to the nucleus, switching on genes that drive proliferation. The arrows diverging from RAS indicate that it regulates many pathways controlling such processes as actin cytoskeletal integrity, cell proliferation, cell differentiation, cell adhesion, apoptosis and cell migration.

Oncogenic RAS and human cancers

We’ve noted that RAS signalling controls functions critical in cancer development and it’s therefore not surprising that it’s mutated, on average, in 22% of all human tumours with pancreatic cancer being an extreme example where 90% of tumours have RAS mutations (the form of RAS is actually KRAS). Those facts, together with the seeming simplicity of its molecular action, put RAS at the top of the target table for chemists seeking cancer therapies. We’ve tried to keep up with events in Mission Impossible, Molecular Dominoes and Where’s that tumour? but the repeated story has been that the upshot of the expenditure of much cash, inspiration and perspiration has, until fairly recently, been zippo. Lots of runners but none that made it into clinical trials. However, that has slowly begun to change over the last ten years and now at least five KRAS-modulating agents are in clinical trials.

A few months back Kevin Lou, Kevan Shokat and colleagues at the University of California published a study of a small molecule, ARS-1620, showing that it inhibited mutant KRAS in lung and pancreatic cancer cells. They screened for other interactions that contribute to the KRAS-driven tumour state and identified two sets of such effectors, one enhancing the engagement of ARS-1620 with its target and others that regulated tumour survival pathways in cells and in vivo. Targetting these synergised with ARS-1620 in suppressing tumour growth.

The RAS switch. Scheme of normal RAS action (top): replacement of a bound guanosine diphosphate (GDP) molecule with guanosine triphosphate (GTP) flips the switch so that RAS can interact with other proteins to turn on downstream signalling pathways that control cell growth and differentiation. Oncogenic RAS (with a single amino acid change at position 12 (Glycine to Valine) blocks the breakdown of bound GTP so the switch is always ‘on’. The new small molecule inhibitor characterized by Canon et al., AMG 510, interacts with KRASG12C to block GTP binding. The switch remains ‘off’ and the cancer-promoting activity of mutant KRAS is inhibited.

More recently Jude Canon at Amgen Research, together with colleagues from a number of institutes, described another small molecule, AMG 510, that also recognises the mutant form of KRAS with high specificity, hence impairing cell proliferation. In mice carrying human pancreatic tumours AMG 510 caused permanent tumour regression — provided the mice had functioning immune systems. In mice lacking T cells (i.e. ‘nude’ mice) the tumours re-grew but combining AMG 510 with immunotherapy (an antibody against anti-PD1) gave complete tumour regression. AMG 510 stimulated the expression of inflammatory chemokines that promoted infiltration of the tumours by T cells and dendritic cells (sometimes called ‘antigen-presenting cells’, these cells process antigens and present fragments thereof on their surface to T cells and B cells to promote the adaptive immune response). In preliminary trials four patients with non-small cell lung cancer showed significant effects — either tumour shrinkage or complete inhibition of growth.

So maybe at long last the enigma of RAS is being prised open. The efficacy of AMG 510 against lung cancers is particularly heartening as there remains little in the way of therapeutic options for these tumours.

References

Canon, J. et al. (2019). The clinical KRAS(G12C) inhibitor AMG 510 drives anti-tumour immunity. Nature 575, 217–223.

Lou, K. et al. (2019). KRASG12C inhibition produces a driver-limited state revealing collateral dependencies. Science Signaling 12, Issue 583, eaaw9450. DOI: 10.1126/scisignal.aaw9450