A Very Odd Coincidence

UntitledOne of the great pleasures of swanning round giving talks on biology and stuff to anyone who’ll listen is meeting an amazing range of wonderful folk with a seemingly limitless number of interesting and clever questions, asked either at the end of a lecture or, quite often, when they queue up afterwards to raise personal points or chat about their own experiences. Wide-ranging though the topics are, there’s one word I can’t recall coming up even once. No surprise really. It’s a very rare disease, even though it’s a kind of sub-group of the lung cancers that kill more people every year than any other type – over one and a half million world-wide in 2012 when there were 23 new cases in every 100,000 people. In the USA the incidence is 38 per 100,000, in Australia it’s 27. The very rare form is called mesothelioma – that’s the one where there’s almost always a history of exposure to asbestos. Rarely mentioned though it is, mesothelioma came up after a lecture I gave last week in the sumptuous premises of the Union, Universities & Schools Club, just up the road from Circular Quay in Sydney, when a gentleman from the audience revealed that his wife had contracted the disease and described how he was seeking the next round of treatment options for her. He was kind enough to say that he was a follower of my blog but he hadn’t trawled sufficiently far back to track down a piece I wrote about a lady called Heather Von St. James. To my considerable embarrassment, I couldn’t on the spur of the moment recall what I’d called it (What’s it all about?  Serves me right for trying to be clever with titles: the idea of this one was convey Heather’s determination to have a life with her children and husband in spite of being dealt the really rough hand of mesothelioma). What is it all about? In contrast to the overall incidence figures for lung cancer, mesothelioma afflicts just under one white American in every 100,000, so it is indeed pretty unusual. The UK has the highest rate (top of something then!) but Australia comes second with 2.9 new cases of mesothelioma per 100 000. Since the early 1980s over 10,000 Australians have died from the disease and the rate is still rising. It’s predicted to start falling after 2020 but, even so, a further 25,000 Australians are expected to die from it over the next four decades, the majority being men. Now Sydney, as you may recall, is the largest city in Australia and it’s in New South Wales, so you might predict that, if you were going to run into mesothelioma anywhere outside the UK, Sydney would be the spot. But why? Well, NSW was the first state in Australia to mine asbestos and it produced the bulk of the chrysotile (white) and amphibole forms. Asbestos of whatever type is now classed as carcinogenic but it was not until the end of 2003 that the use of all forms of asbestos was banned in Australia. The hazard remains, however, because of the widespread use that had been made of asbestos for construction, both residential and commercial. The risk can be seen from the near doubling of mesothelioma incidence in NSW between 1987 and 2006, with an even bigger increase being seen in women – attributed largely to second-hand exposure. And the freaky happening? The very next day after my conversation at the Universities Club, and completely out of the blue, I received an email from Heather about what she describes as her ‘life’s mission to educate people about this deadly disease’. Having told the story, perhaps the most helpful thing I can do by way of supporting this remarkable lady is to spread the word of her initiative by advertising the web site.

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