RoboClot

 

It was the Chinese, inevitably, who invented paper – during the Eastern Han period around 200 CE (or AD as I’d put it). Presumably by 201 AD some of the lads at the back of the class had discovered that this new stuff could be folded and launched to land on the desk of the local Confucius, generating much hilarity and presumably a few whacks with a bamboo cane.

Folding molecules

Not to be outdone some 21st century scholars have shown that you can do molecular origami with DNA. The idea is fairly simple: take a long strand of DNA (several thousand bases) and persuade it to fold into specific shapes by adding ‘staples’ — short bits of DNA (oligonucleotides). When you mix them together the staples and scaffold strands self-assemble in a single step. It’s pretty amazing but it’s driven by the simple concept of Watson-Crick base pairing (adenine (A) binds to thymine (T): guanine (G) to cytosine (C)).

These things are, of course, almost incomprehensibly small — they are biological molecules remember — each being a few nanometers long. Which means that you can plonk a billion on the head of a pin.

Working on this scale has given rise to the science of nanorobotics ­— making gadgets on a nanometre scale (10−9 meters or one thousandth of a millionth of a metre) and the gizmos themselves are nanorobots — nanobots to their friends.

Making parcels of DNA must be great fun but it’s not much use until you include the fact that you can stick protein molecules to your DNA carrier. If you choose a protein that has a known target, for example, something on the surface of a cell, you can now mail the parcels to an address within the body simply by injecting them into the circulation.

Molecular origami: Making a DNA parcel with a targeting protein. A bacteriophage is a virus that infects and replicates in bacteria, used here to make single strands of DNA. Short DNA ‘staples’ are designed to fold the scaffold DNA into specific shapes. Adding an aptamer (e.g., a protein that binds to a specific target molecule on a cell (an antigen)) permits targeting of the nanobot. When it sticks to a cell the package opens and the molecular payload is released (from Fu and Yan, 2012).

Open with care

Hao Yan and colleagues from Arizona State University have now taken nanobots a step further by adding a second protein to their targeted vehicle. For their targeting protein they used something that sticks to a protein present on the surface of cells that line the walls of blood vessels when they are proliferating (the target protein’s called nucleolin). Generally these (endothelial) cells aren’t proliferating so they don’t make nucleolin — and the nanobots pass them by. But growing tumours need to make their own blood supply. To do that they stimulate new vessels to sprout into the tumour (called angiogenesis) and this is what Hao Yan’s nanobots target.

As an anti-cancer tactic the nanobots carried a second protein: thrombin. This is a critical part of the process of coagulation by which damaged blood vessels set about repairing themselves. Thrombin’s role is to convert fibrinogen (circulating in blood) to fibrin strands, hence building up a blood clot to plug the hole. In effect the nanobots cause thrombosis, inducing a blood clot to block the supply line to the tumour.

Blood clotting (coagulation). Platelets form a plug strengthened by fibrin produced by the action of thrombin.

Does it work?

These DNA nanorobots showed no adverse effects either in mice or in Bama miniature pigs, which exhibit high similarity to humans in anatomy and physiology.

Fluorescently labeled nanobots did indeed target tumour blood vessels: the DNA wrapping opens when they attach to cells and the thrombin is released …

Fluorescent nanobots targetting tumour blood vessels (Li et al. 2018). The nanorobots have stuck to cells lining blood vessels (endothelial cells: green membrane) by attaching to nucleolin. After 8 hours the nanorobots (red) have been taken up by the cells and can be seen next to the nucleus (blue).

Most critically these little travellers did have effects on tumour growth. The localized thrombosis caused by the released thrombin resulted in significant tumour cell death and marked increase in the survival of treated mice.

Robotic DNA machines are now being referred to as ‘intelligent vehicles’ — a designation I’m not that keen on. Nevertheless, this is a cunning strategy, not least because, although much effort has gone into anti-angiogenic therapies for cancer, they have not been notably successful. Simply administering thrombin would presumably be fatal but, well wrapped up and correctly addressed, it seems to deliver.

Reference

Fu, J. and Yan, H. (2012). Controlled drug release by a nanorobot. Nature Biotechnology 30, 407-408.

Suping Li et al. (2018). A DNA nanorobot functions as a cancer therapeutic in response to a molecular trigger in vivo. Nature Biotechnology doi:10.1038/nbt.4071

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Twenty more winks

In Episode One we alerted ourselves to the large amount of evidence saying that a good night’s sleep really is essential if you wish to reduce your chances of a wide variety of medical misfortunes. But what do we know about how molecules respond to sleep disruption to produce such nasty effects?

Molecular Clocks

Life on earth depends on energy sent forth by the sun and, in synchrony with the rotation of our planet, many of the inner workings of mammals fluctuate over each period of roughly 24 hours. This pattern is called the circadian clock, its most obvious manifestation being the sleep-wake cycle. Over the years considerable evidence has accumulated that the link between shift-work and cancer is probably due to circadian rhythm disruption and suppression of nocturnal production of a hormone called melatonin. All living things make melatonin (in mammals in the pineal gland of the brain) and it signals through a variety of protein receptors on cells to regulate the sleep-wake cycle but it also plays a role in protecting DNA from damage.

Melatonin production is regulated by the circadian oscillator, itself controlled by two sets of proteins that control each other’s expression in a feedback loop. Thus one pair, CLOCK and BMAL1, activates Cryptochrome and Period. They in turn repress CLOCK and BMAL1 – the upshot being that the activities of both pairs oscillate over a day-night cycle: as one goes up the other comes down. These central regulators are encoded by evolutionarily ancient genes (two for Cryptochromes and three for Period proteins). In plants and insects CRY1 responds to light but in mammals CRY1 and CRY2 work independently of light to inhibit BMAL1-CLOCK.

Two interlocked feedback loops control clock protein expression

CRY-CLOCK

OUTCOME: ≈ 24 hour cycle expression of PER & CRY

BMAL1 & CLOCK 12 hours out of phase

Alarming the Clock

So having sounded the alarm that just one night’s sleep shortage has obvious effects, what do the genes make of it? Well, the short answer is they get upset. A recent study took blood samples from a group of normal people and found that more than 700 genes (about 3% of our total number) significantly changed their level of expression over 1 week of insufficient sleep (5.7 h) by comparison with 1 week of sufficient sleep (8.5 h). About two-thirds were reduced whilst one-third was up-regulated (made more of their protein product). Unsurprisingly, among those that went down were the major clock regulators. It’s worth noting that the sleep perturbation in this experiment was relatively mild – intended to be similar to that experienced by many individuals. The genes most strongly affected play roles in a wide range of biological processes – DNA structure (hence gene expression), metabolism, stress responses and inflammation. The responses of genes to changes in sleep patterns are not the result of mutation (i.e. changes in the sequence of DNA)  but, at least in part, they’re caused by small changes in the structure of DNA. {These are epigenetic modifications – any modification of DNA, other than in the sequence of bases, that affects how an organism develops or functions. They’re brought about by tacking small chemical groups either on to some of the bases in DNA itself or on to the proteins (histones) that act like cotton reels around which DNA wraps itself}. Thus there is evidence for gene silencing by hyper-methylation of CRY2 (adding methyl groups (CH3) to its DNA) and the converse effect of hypo-methylation (removing methyl groups) of CLOCK occurs in women engaged in long-term shift work and is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer.

Inflaming the Problem

The cells that mediate inflammation and immune responses also have circadian clocks – meaning that normally these processes are rhythmically controlled and clock disruption (for example by sleep loss) affects this pattern. Disabling the clock in mice (by knocking out CRY altogether) switches on the release of pro-inflammatory messengers and knocking out one of the Period genes (PER2) makes mice cancer-prone – reflecting the fact that MYC (the key proliferation driver) is directly controlled by circadian regulators and is consistently elevated in the absence of PER2.

Clock Faces

The mass that comprises a tumour is a mixture of cells – cancer cells and normal cells attracted to the locale – so it’s a quite abnormal environment and in particular there may be regions where the supply of oxygen and nutrients is limited. This is sensed as a stress by the cells, one response being to lower protein production until normal conditions are restored. If this doesn’t happen within a given time the response switches to one leading to cell suicide. One way in which overall protein output can be reduced is by activating an enzyme (IRE1α) that breaks down code-carrying messenger RNAs that direct assembly of new proteins. Remarkably, it has emerged that one of the mRNAs targetted by IRE1α is the core circadian clock gene, PER1. The degradation of PER1 mRNA means that less PER1 protein is made, which in turn disrupts the clock. However, it seems that PER1 has other roles that include helping the cell suicide response – a major anti-cancer defence. All of which suggests that disruption of the IRE1α/ PER1 balance might have serious consequences. Indeed IRE1α mutations have been found in a variety of cancers including brain tumours in which low levels of PER1 are an indicator of poor prognosis. The IRE1α mechanism coincidentally activates the transcription factor XBP1 (as well as PER1 mRNA decay) and one target of XBP1 is the gene encoding a messenger (CXCL3) that makes blood vessels sprout offshoots. Thus this master regulator suppresses cell death, activates proliferation (lowering PER1 deregulates MYC) and promotes new blood vessel formation.

A Tip for Snoozing

If you’re still wide awake it just goes to prove the utter fascination of biology – but today’s story says that you have to find ways of, if not falling asleep, at least courting insensibility (as Christopher Fry put it). If it’s a real problem for you may I make a really radical suggestion? Turn to our physicist friends and select from their recent literary avalanche. A ‘brief history of …’ something or other will do fine. It’s a knock-out! Sweet dreams!!

References

Möller-Levet, C.S., Archer, S.N., Bucca, G., Laing, E.E., Slak, A., Kabiljo, R., Lo, J.C.Y., Santhi, N., von Schantz, M., Smith, C.P. and Dijk, D.-J. (2013). Effects of insufficient sleep on circadian rhythmicity and expression amplitude of the human blood transcriptome. PNAS 110, E1132-E1141.

Fu, L.N. et al. (2002). The circadian gene Period2 plays an important role in tumor suppression and DNA damage response in vivo. Cell 111, 41-50.

Zhu, Y. et al. (2011). Epigenetic impact of long-term shiftwork: pilot evidence from circadian genes and whole-genome methylation analysis. Chronobiol Int, 28, 852–861.

Pluquet, O. et al. (2013). Posttranscriptional Regulation of PER1 Underlies the Oncogenic Function of IREα. Cancer Res., 73, 4732-4743.